By Stephanie NeubauerIn the spring of 2019, food truck manager Amika Shawntaa was waiting for her lunch when she noticed an open box of fresh vegetables sitting at her desk.

It was a rare treat for her, she thought, since there were no lunch specials at the corner store she frequents every day.

“I was like, ‘Oh my God, what is this?’,” Shawndaa recalls.

Shawntsa was just a little kid at the time, but she’s grown up to become one of the most prominent figures in the food delivery business.

In addition to her job at Shawtona Food Truck, she works as an associate chef at the Shawntona Bakery, where she is also the pastry chef.

“We’ve got all the ingredients, but we’ve never really had any of the people eat it.

It’s really, really good.”

In the last year, Shawtas food truck has been recognized for its dedication to sustainability, quality, and quality food.

“It’s really good food, really nutritious food,” she says.

“It’s not like it’s going to be in a dumpster and thrown out.

It just needs to be cooked and properly prepared.”

Shawtaa says her truck is one of many small food truck operators in Quebec, and it’s not just because of their large numbers.

“They’re the ones who are actually putting food on the table.

As the summer season approaches, Shawantaa is looking forward to another exciting season.””

I think there’s a lot of good things happening here, and a lot to be excited about.”

As the summer season approaches, Shawantaa is looking forward to another exciting season.

“Our goal is to have another season where people are really eating,” she adds.

“And the more people we have to feed, the more we’ll have to go and buy food.”

The food truck revolution is about to take off in QuebecAs Shawandaa sees it, the food revolution is already underway in Quebec.

She says she’s already seeing positive results.

“The first time I came to my office I had to take a lot off of my plate because the truckers were so busy, but the food is so much better.”

Shawanta says the first year was a real struggle, but that this year, with the help of the government, she and her team have been able to expand their business.

“Now we have a lot more staff, we have better supplies, and we have more people who understand the importance of the food.”

“So we are growing.”

Shayna Shawanton, owner of the Shawaonte Food Truck and owner of Shawtons Bistro in Shawtona, Quebec, is looking to expand in the coming year.

(Jacques Bouchard/CBC)Shawnton says she has to remind herself that the food industry has a long way to go before it is ready to become a sustainable and viable industry.

“When we started, there was no government or government-run food service,” she explains.

“But I do know that it is really, truly a small part of the whole.””

Shwanton says that while her customers are willing to wait for food when they come to her restaurant, the majority of them are happy to eat when they leave.””

But I do know that it is really, truly a small part of the whole.”

Shwanton says that while her customers are willing to wait for food when they come to her restaurant, the majority of them are happy to eat when they leave.

“They’re eating at the restaurants, so we need to get people to come back.””

Shawna Shawaton, owner and owner-operator of Shawaona Food Truck in Shawtons Bistrot in Shawona, says she is hoping to grow her business by 2018. “

They’re eating at the restaurants, so we need to get people to come back.”

Shawna Shawaton, owner and owner-operator of Shawaona Food Truck in Shawtons Bistrot in Shawona, says she is hoping to grow her business by 2018.

(Shawttanas Bistrale)Shawanton is excited to see how Quebec’s food truck industry will grow, but it’s also important to remind her that Quebec is not unique in this regard.

“There’s a really big food truck business in Toronto, and there’s also a big food trucks business in the U.K. and Germany,” she said.

“If Quebec is going to have a food truck renaissance, we’re going to need a lot bigger, better food trucks in Quebec.”